Share DP24/32 Equipment Related Tips

Discussion in '2488 and DP-24/32 Digital Portastudios' started by cmaffia, Jan 7, 2019.

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  1. cmaffia

    cmaffia Moderator Staff Member

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    Curated topics from the Forum that are geared toward understanding the DP24/32 environment, such as:
    • File Import;
    • Connecting Outboard Gear;
    • Signal Levels;
    • Impedance Matching;
    • Passive Transformers and DI Boxes;
    • Recovering From Software Boot Failure;
    • Recovering From a File Error Message;
    • Selecting a Monitor or Reference Speaker.
    ************** NEW: INDEX TO EQUIPMENT TIPS (v2020-05-23) *************

    ----------------------------------- FILE RELATED -------------------------------------------------
    Audio Depot File Import……………………………………………………………………………………Post 2
    More On Audio Depot Import/Export………………………………………………………………...Post 26
    Moving Custom User Settings To A New SD Card………………………………………………..Post 14
    Recovering From Dp-24/32/SD Software Boot Up Failure…………………………………...Post 8
    Recovering From A Dp-24/32/SD “File Error” Message……………………………………….Post 9

    -------------------------------- SD CARD RELATED -----------------------------------------------
    Backing Up The SD Card…………………………………………………………………………………...Post 24
    Firmware Updates…………………………………………………………………………………………....Post 28
    Tascam Approved SD Cards……………………………………………………………………………….Post 17
    How To Read A Sandisk Product Number……………………………………………………………Post 21
    To Put The Cap On SD Card Issues……………………………………………………………………..Post 23

    ---------------------- INTERFACING OUTBOARD GEAR ------------------------------------
    Connecting Outboard Gear………………………………………………………………………………..Post 3
    Using External Gear in Bounce Mode…………………………………………………………………Post 30
    Impedance Matching………………………………………………………………………………………...Post 4
    Using Vocal Harmonizers As Effects (Reverb, Etc.)………………………………………………Post 11, 12
    Create Automatic Vocal Harmonies Using A Harmonizer……………………………………..Post 13
    Creating A Gapless Practice Loop……………………………………………………………………….Post 16
    Using Outboard Gear During Mixdown……………………………………………………………….Post 25
    The Basics Of Syncing A Dp-24/32 With A Midi Drum Machine……………………………Post 19
    Another Way To Interface Midi………………………………………………………………………….Post 20

    -------------------- INPUT/OUTPUT SIGNAL FLOW -----------------------------------------
    Comprehensive List Of Effect Parameters…………………………………………………………….Post 18
    Making A Unity Gain Test…………………………………………………………………………………..Post 7
    Passive Transformers And Di Boxes…………………………………………………………………….Post 6
    Selecting A Monitor Or Reference Speaker…………………………………………………………..Post 10, 29
    Signal Levels……………………………………………………………………………………………….........Post 5
    Troubleshooting Signal Flow……………………………………………………………………………….Post 27
    Understanding Dbu & Dbfs In The Recording And Mixing Processes………………………Post 22
    Using The Send 1 For Dual Signal Out…………………………………………………………………..Post 15
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 8, 2020
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  2. Mark Richards

    Mark Richards Well-Known Member

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    AUDIO DEPOT FILE IMPORT:

    Caveats to keep in mind:

    (a) The name of the file brought into Audio Depot must be no more than 15 characters.wav (e.g. xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.wav) or the Unit will not even list it for import.

    (b) The Import screen of Audio Depot will truncate long file names to 8 characters.wav (e.g. xxxxxx~1.wav / xxxxxx~2.wav / etc.)

    (c) The sample/bit rate of the file(s) you're importing must be the same as the song to which you're doing the import.

    When importing files via Audio Depot, it's important to remember that the Unit display will truncate long file names to 8 characters. So 'mysong1trk15.wav becomes 'mysong~1.wav'; 'mysong1trk16.wav' becomes 'mysong~2.wav', etc. on the Unit display.

    Knowing this can be important if you are exporting your song to consolidate all the snippets for each Track into a contiguous flow for re-import to the Unit (e.g. so you can free up space on the SD card).

    Audio Depot will export the actual zz000--.wav files as song-name plus the individual Track numbers as the last few characters. But the Unit's display will truncate to eight-places.wav when imported back, removing the Track numbers at the end of the file names.

    So if Track order is important when using the 'Import' function, before making the import to Audio Depot, open Audio Depot on your computer and rename the files on the computer to place the Track number first, e.g ‘T15mysong1trk15.wav’, ‘T16mysong1trk16.wav’, etc. This will make things a lot easier when they are brought back to the unit via the 'Import' function. Just remember that the actual file name must be 15 characters or less.
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2019
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  3. Mark Richards

    Mark Richards Well-Known Member

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    CONNECTING OUTBOARD GEAR (Compressors, Reverbs, Mixers, etc.)

    DP-xx A~H Low Impedance (LowZ) XLR (Balancd) Mic Inputs & DP-xx High Impedance (HiZ) 1/4" TRS (Balanced) Phone Line Inputs
    • TRS and XLR inputs/cables have two hot wires and a ground shield inside. The same signal is carried through both hot wires.
    • Typically one signal is made out-of-phase with the other electronically by the receiving device's input circuitry and only one of the hot wires carries the signal into the receiving input circuitry.
    • The out-of-phase signal cancels out any noise that built up in the signal.
    This is an oversimplification, but the idea is to compensate for signal loss in long cable runs by eliminating noise buildup so a clean signal can be raised up to a usable level at the end of the long cable run.

    You need to pay attention to the input (Load) / output (Source) impedances of the outboard gear and the input (Load) / output (Source) impedances of the DP-xx. The Load Impedance should be at least 5x the Source Impedance, and preferably 10x or better (more on that can be found in the post on “Impedance Matching”).
    • The DP-xx XLR Mic Inputs are Low Impedance – 2.4kOhm (LowZ Load)
    • The DP 1/4" TRS 1/4" Phone Line Inputs are High Impedance - 22kOhm (HiZ Load).
    • The DP-xx TS/RCA and TRS 1/4" Phone Line outputs are all High Impedance – 22kOHM (HiZ Source)
    DP-xx Out (Source) to Outboard Gear In (Load)
    • The DP-xx Send and Stereo outputs are HiZ RCA/TS (unbalanced) jacks out.
    • The DP-xx Monitor phone jacks out are 1/4" TRS (balanced). If connecting via the DP-xx Monitor out, keep in mind the Monitor out circuit puts out significantly more power than the RCA outs since the Monitor out is designed to connect to powered speakers or a power amp.
    • On the outboard gear, the HiZ input could be a TS/RCA unbalanced jack, a TS 1/4" Phone unbalanced jack, or a TRS (balanced) 1/4" phone jack. You need to check the specs of the outboard gear to make sure you are matching the DP-xx and the outboard gear outputs and inputs.
    Outboard Gear Out (Source) to DP-xx In (Load)
    • The outboard gear outputs to use must be HiZ for pairing with the DP-xx HiZ line inputs.
    Warning: The DP-xx XLR LowZ mic inputs are not compatible with HiZ XLR outputs found on some outboard gear. You absolutely do not want to run a HiZ XLR output into a DP-xx XLR mic input. The outboard gear is not a microphone.​
    • If the outboard gear has TS/RCA unbalanced jacks out, then use TS/RCA (unbalanced) to TS 1/4" phone plug (unbalanced) to connect into the DP-xx Inputs (A~H) and set the Trim Pot full left (counterclockwise).
    • If the outboard gear has mono (TS) 1/4" (unbalanced) phone jack out, then use 1/4" mono (unbalanced) phone plugs to connect into the DP-xx Inputs (A~H) and set the Trim Pot full left (counterclockwise).
    • If the outboard gear has TRS 1/4" (balanced) phone jacks, then use TRS 1/4" balanced) phone plugs to connect into the DP-xx Inputs (A~H) and set the Trim Pot full left (counterclockwise).
    The big advantage in using matching connections on each end whenever you can is simplicity and peace of mind (the KISS philosophy).

    IMO the least expensive and most practical method is to keep the entire link High Z/unbalanced if the cable run is short. You can use 1/4" TS male connectors on both ends, even if the outboard gear output jack and the DP input jack are TRS balanced. If the High Z cable run is >12 feet (4 meters) and both devices have TRS jacks, then TRS male connectors should be used. In either case, set the DP-xx trim pot full left at the line level setting, and use the source outboard gear’s signal output control (not the DP’s Trim Knob) to adjust the level coming into the DP.

    If you are dead set on connecting the HiZ outboard gear into the DP-xx LowZ XLR mic Inputs (A~H), you are very strongly urged to use HiZ to LowZ impedance step down transformers. The transformer typically would be TS 1/4" plug on one end for connection to the outboard gear; male XLR on the other end. The transformer connects to the DP-xx using a standard XLR M/F mic cable or XLR M/F short patch cable. The necessary step down transformer and the cable should be available at most pro audio stores (more on that can be found in the post on “Passive Transformers and DI Boxes”).

    Balanced Cable v Unbalance Cable

    The only time a balanced cable is a better option than unbalanced is when the cable run needs to be longer than about 4 meters (or about 12 feet), or if there's a specific problem with R(adio) F(requency) I(nterference) - like florescent lighting may cause, or a computer may cause; or a pesky ground loop exists. Absent any RFI or ground loop problems, there's nothing wrong with using an unbalanced cable and connectors for short cable runs. If the cable run is under 6 feet I would use unbalanced cable.

    Problems can crop up where TS/TRS/XLR type adapters are used, typically when the adapter shorts out the signal due to a mismatch of input/output types.
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2019
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  4. Mark Richards

    Mark Richards Well-Known Member

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    IMPEDENCE MATCHING:

    Think of impedance in terms of water flowing through a pipe. The larger the pipe, the greater the volume of water can pass through the pipe, from minimum flow to maximum flow without backing up. Ideally, you want to match the incoming flow of water to the flow capacity of the pipe to maximize the efficiency of the flow.
    • The XLR mic input jack is low impedance (2.4 kOhm - two thousand four hundred Ohms). This is mic level - all mics with XLR cables are low impedance. Do not connect high impedance sources to this XLR input jack.
    • The 1/4" Phone input jack is high impedance (>22 kOhm - twenty two thousand Ohms). This is line level. Connecting a low impedance mic to the high impedance 1/4" phone jack requires a low to high impedance transformer that is XLR on one end and 1/4" TS phone plug on the other.
    • The Input H "guitar" switch converts the 1/4" phone jack impedance from 22 kOhms to an extremely high 1 mOhm (1 million Ohms). This allows directly plugging in the guitar, which itself is high impedance (typically 40kOhms), but is twice as high as the DP’s line level input impedance, which creates an undesirable impedance mismatch.
    • If using a pre-amp or stomp box in the guitar chain prior to connecting to Input H, do not set the “guitar” switch to the “On” position unless the source's own impedance is greater than 22 kOhm. Typically the 1m Ohm impedance is not needed with a stomp box in the chain and turning on the “guitar” switch may lower the signal, add noise, or introduce some other type of signal degradation.
    It's okay generally to run a low impedance device into a high impedance device. The only downside is lower sound/more noise in the signal level than there would be when pairing the low impedance output device with a low impedance input device.

    It's very bad to run a high impedance output device into a low impedance input device. Distortion and signal degradation is the least of the bad things that can happen. Permanent damage to delicate electronic circuits is the worst case scenario.
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2019
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  5. Mark Richards

    Mark Richards Well-Known Member

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    DP-xx SIGNAL LEVELS:

    (The "Level Diagram" in the Specifications section of the DP-xx owner manual is a good visual reference)

    The dBu numbers (see above reference to the owner manual) are all in reference to the difference between the lowest signal input that can be processed and the maximum signal level the circuit can handle referenced to a standard voltage (OdBu = .775 volts).

    For the DP-xx, OdBFs = +2dBu. The DP-xx can handle a line input level of +20dBu, but that is +18dBu over OdBFs. In the digital world, anything over 0dBFS is distortion, so there is no such thing, for example, as +3dBFS.
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  6. Mark Richards

    Mark Richards Well-Known Member

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    PASSIVE TRANSFORMERS AND DI BOXES

    A passive transformer's main design purpose is to change the XLR microphone's output impedance from LowZ to HiZ, increase the mic signal by about +25dB, and filter out any cable noise at the HiZ input so that the LowZ mic can be used effectively with a HiZ input.
    • But it will also work in reverse, converting an unbalanced High Z line level output to XLR Low Z; and reducing the High Z line level signal by -25dB so it won't overdrive the XLR input.
    • If the High Z line’s output is TRS balanced, at the High Z/transformer connection the transformer (TS on the 1/4" phone plug side) treats the signal as unbalanced TS, turns it back into balanced, and converts the HiZ to LowZ. So TS v TRS has no relevance. The signal arrives as a balanced/LowZ at the XLR LowZ input jack.
    • A typical basic passive direct injection (DI) box is designed to convert an unbalanced HiZ guitar pickup signal to a balanced LowZ signal for connection to a balanced XLR input where a long cable run (>12 feet/4 meters or so) is required. Some advanced design DI boxes may function like a reversed XLR mic transformer.
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2019
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  7. Mark Richards

    Mark Richards Well-Known Member

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    MAKING A UNITY GAIN TEST

    This helps determine that "what goes in" is "what comes out".
    • Feed white noise into a Track. (White noise encompasses the entire audible frequency range. The easiest available source for white noise is FM inter-station noise. Just put a mic in front of an FM radio's speaker.)
    • Keep the Trim Knob full CW-mic (or full CCW-line if your source will be line level)
    • Set the Track Fader to Unity Gain - 0 dBFS position.
    • Set the Stereo Master Fader to Unity Gain (all the way up).
    • Set the Track pan full left. The Stereo Master Meter and the Track Meter should read identically. Monitor/listen to the white noise long enough to familiarize yourself with the sound.
    • Use your mic placement and the FM radio's volume control to bring the Track Meter level to or as close to 0 dBFS with no excursion into red.
    • Record about 15 seconds of the white noise. Rewind and play back. The Stereo Master Fader should read exactly the same as it did before hitting record. The audio should sound exactly the same as it did before hitting record.
    • Play back the recorded sound over your monitors and play the radio's inter-station noise at the same time and at the same level. They should sound identical.
    You can also use a free SPL (sound pressure level) smartphone app to measure the audio level of your source and monitor signals at the speaker to be sure the audio levels are identical. If they aren't, adjust the respective amplifier volume controls until they are.
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2019
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  8. Mark Richards

    Mark Richards Well-Known Member

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    DP-24, vintage 40-4
    RECOVERING FROM DP-xx SOFTWARE BOOT UP FAILURE

    It appears that the dp-xx.sys file may somehow become corrupted on untested SD cards, making it impossible to boot the DP-24/32.

    This process may make your card usable again, or at least make it readable on your computer so you can recover the music files.
    • After loading a failed DP-xxSD Card to a Windows PC, a pop-up screen will indicate there was a problem with the card and ask to fix it. Pressing “Yes” initiates the needed fix to the SD Card.
    • With the card now accessible on the computer, delete the dp-xx.sys file from the SD card.
    • From your computer’s DP- backup folder copy the dp-xx.sys file over to the SD card.
    • Eject the SD card from the computer; install it on the DP-xx. Turn on the DP-xx and...if the gremlins aren't paying attention and the planets are in alignment...the DP-xx may boot right up with no loss of music files.
    If the DP-xx wants to create the sys file on startup, do it, and once the card loads, transfer the contents to another card, and stop using it, because there's a good chance it's on the way to total failure.
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2019
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  9. Mark Richards

    Mark Richards Well-Known Member

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    RECOVERING FROM A DP-xx “FILE ERROR” MESSAGE

    The Scenario
    During a recording/overdub/bounce session, your DP-xx freezes, and after pulling the plug and restarting, the screen displays a "File Error" message when trying to load the song that you were working on.

    Possible Solution
    The last Track(s) you were working on when your DP-xx froze may have been corrupted and is preventing the song from loading.
    1. Open the SD card in your computer.
    2. Open the music/song folder.
    3. Starting with the highest numbered "zz" .wav file and working backwards from that file, test each file by trying to open it with a media player that plays .wav files.
    If a file doesn't open in your media player, it's been corrupted. Move the corrupted file from the song folder to another location and repeat until you have identified and moved all the corrupted files (typically it will only be the one or two most current Tracks you were working on).

    Remove the SD card from the computer, insert it back into your DP-xx, turn your DP-xx back on, and try to load the problem song.

    If the planets are in alignment and the gremlins aren't paying attention, you might just get the whole song back less the Track(s) you were working on when your DP-xx froze.
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2019
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  10. Mark Richards

    Mark Richards Well-Known Member

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    SELECTING A MONITOR OR REFERENCE SPEAKER:

    Some things to keep in mind when choosing speakers as a recording tool:

    (1) You need to consider whether you want the speakers as a monitoring tool during tracking and overdub; as a reference tool for mixdown/mastering, or both.

    (2) Another thing you need to consider is the instruments and type of music you'll be working with. This chart can help with that (click on thumbnail to enlarge):

    Music Frequency Chart (Color).JPG
    [Source: http://www.independentrecording.net/irn/resources/freqchart/main_display.htm]

    For example, for speakers with a stated Frequency Response (FR) of 80Hz~22kHz (but without a stated +/- x dB variance in relation to the standard 1kHz reference point) it's hard to judge how accurately the speakers will yield a recording that will sound good on other playback systems.

    • 80Hz~22kHz +/- 2 dB referenced to 1kHz is great - this is a flat, neutral response;
    • 80Hz~22kHz +/- 10 dB referenced to 1kHz - not so much - there's wide variation, and that will color unnaturally and in unkown ways your mixing/master recordings.
    Use the above chart to compare various instruments and voices to the stated FR for the speaker in which your are interested.
    • Will the speaker reproduce the lowest notes on a bass instrument, or only reproduce the higher overtones/harmonics of the lowest notes
    • Will the speaker reproduce a guitar and vocals nicely if there's reasonable variation (e.g. +/- 3dB). around the 1kHz reference point.
    Unless you've made a successful effort to acoustically tune your mixing room/listening position, near field monitors will be your best bet to minimize the impact on your mix of the room's acoustic anomalies.
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2019
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  11. -mjk-

    -mjk- Moderator Staff Member

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    DP-32, | 2A Mixer, A3440
    I have a TC-Helicon Voicelive Touch 2. It has a Hi-Z guitar input, and a Low-Z mic input. The guitar input is for chord reference and passes through the effects chain in a totally different path. Only the mic input is fully processed by all 9 effects. Not long after I bought the unit, I read that it's possible to use it as an outboard processor by sending line level to it. Thinking that was a mistake, I wrote to TC-Helicon, and they told me to turn the input level knob fully CCW and use the XLR jack to feed the FX send from the console. Ever since then, I've been using it like a line level device and it functions perfectly. Clearly, they designed it this way, otherwise it would blow up the input.

    I'm using this unit as an external effects processor with my DP-32. Works very well.
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2019
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  12. Mark Richards

    Mark Richards Well-Known Member

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    I'll be darned.

    Tried it with my TC-Helicon Voicetone Harmonizer GX-T.

    DP-24 HiZ unbalanced Send 2 out into GX-T's XLR LowZ mic input, set full CCW to minimum input gain, and careful setting of the DP Send Levels.
    • Noting that -mjk- has the VoiceLive Touch 2, a step or two up from the GT-X and perhaps with better circuitry, on the G-XT I'm hearing slight distortion on louder sections even though the GX-T isn't showing any red on the input.
    • Also, to my ears it sounds like the HiZ to LowZ connection compresses the signal and kills the dynamics.
    • I think for the GX-T using a HiZ to LowZ stepdown transformer yields a much cleaner result.
    Turning the GX-T harmony feature off, it makes sense to be able to use the GX-T as outboard gear for its reverb, delay, and doubling effects. I tried out just the reverb & delay effects with an acoustic guitar...it did sound good, but mono only (no stereo spread from the returns using two DP-24 tracks panned L/R).

    So there it is folks...check with the manufacturer first, and take care with the levels, and rely on your ears.;)

    I think this equipment tips sticky thread could become a real treasure trove of information.
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2019
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  13. Mark Richards

    Mark Richards Well-Known Member

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    DP-24, vintage 40-4
    Here's how I use my DP-24 to create automatic vocal harmonies using the TC-Helicon Voicetune Harmony G-XT.

    Background first:
    The G-XT is meant for live performing by a singer/guitarist. It can create very credible harmonies on the fly based on the vocal and either the chord being played in accompaniment, manually entering the song's key, or the using song's key saved in a pre-set (the G-XT has 20 pre-sets).

    It also has several doubling, reverb and echo effects to chose from, an auto-tune feature, and auto gating, compression and EQ, all of which can be turned on/off or used in various setting combinations.

    It has an XLR LowZ mic input, 1/4" TS (mono) phone HiZ guitar input and pass through, and XLR LowZ stereo harmony output or left-harmony/right-dry vocal output.

    My process:

    STEP 1
    • Connect mic and guitar to G-XT inputs
    • Set G-XT output to left-harmony vocal/right-dry vocal
    • Select two harmonies that compliment the song (e.g. a 3rd higher and a 3rd lower)
    • Use the pass through to connect the guitar to DP-24 1/4" TRS HiZ phone Input H
    • Set Input H to line (not guitar) and turn trim pot full left
    • Connect the G-XT left/right XLR LowZ outs to DP-24 XLR Inputs A & B
    • Set Inputs A & B trim pots full left initially, and adjust as needed
    • Set G-XT input/output levels to unity gain
    • Assign Input A to Track 1 (Harmony); Input B to Track 2 (Dry Vocal)
    • Assign Input H to Track 3 (rhythm guitar)
    • Record song
    I now have two harmonies on Track 1 in mono; my dry vocal in mono on Track 2; my rhythm guitar in mono on Track 3 and Step 1 is complete.

    STEP 2
    • Remove mic and guitar cables from the G-XT
    • Connect DP-24 Send 1 to the G-XT XLR LowZ mic input using a Shure HiZ to LowZ stepdown transformer
    • Connect DP-24 Send 2 to the G-XT 1/4" TS (mono) phone HiZ guitar input
    • Set DP-24 Track 2 (Vocal) Send 1 to "Pre, 100" and Master 1 to "100"
    • Set DP-24 Track 3 (Guitar) Send 2 to "Pre,127" and Master 2 to "127"
    • Assign DP-24 Input A to Track 4 and Input B to Track 5
    The G-XT relies on rhythm guitar chords to establish accurate harmonies, so it's necessary to send the now pre-recorded Track 3 rhythm guitar back to the G-XT HiZ guitar input via DP-24 Send 2, but there is no need to record the rhythm guitar again.

    [I've also programmed all the major and minor keys into the Pre-sets so it isn't always necessary to use the guitar to establish the harmonies. For example, if the song is in C Major, I use Pre-set #1, which is set to Hall Reverb, Natural Stereo Doubling, 3rd Hi Harmony on left output/3rd Low Harmony on right output. All the effects can be changed easily if the song calls for a different combination of effects and harmonies.]

    Step 3

    • Set the G-XT to unity gain
    • Set G-XT to stereo harmony output (left/right)
    • Select the same two harmonies used in Step 1 (e.g. a 3rd higher and a 3rd lower)
    • On the DP-24 reset the song to the beginning
    • Play the pre-recorded vocal (Track 2) and rhythm guitar (Track 3)
    • Record the harmonies again this time in stereo: Track 4 (Harmony a 3rd higher up) and Track 5 (Harmony a 3rd lower down)
    Repeat on additional tracks (6/7; 8/9; etc.) for a third harmony part (e.g. 1 octave low) or alternate harmonies (e.g. two high, two low, etc).

    RESULT
    With only one live pass of the vocal and rhythm guitar, I now have available:
    • The dry vocal on Track 2
    • The dry rhythm guitar on track 3
    • Two harmonies in mono on Track 1 that I can use as filler or offset slightly for a double track effect to blend with the stereo harmony tracks
    • One harmony part on Track 4 (3rd up) with full control over blend level, sound field placement, etc.
    • One harmony part on Track 5 (3rd down) with full control over blend level, sound field placement, etc.
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2019
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  14. Mark Richards

    Mark Richards Well-Known Member

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    DP-24, vintage 40-4
    MOVING CUSTOM USER SETTINGS TO A NEW SD CARD
    Custom User settings created for Effects:Reverb/Delay/Chorus; custom User settings created for Master/Compressor, and for Master/EQ, are stored in the DP-xx.sys file.

    Once you've created custom User settings, as long as you keep all your songs on the same SD card, those custom User settings will be available universally to songs you create on that SD card

    BUT, if you change SD cards, reformat an old card, or format a new card, those custom User settings do not migrate from the old SD card to the new SD card.

    READ THIS BEFORE YOU GO FURTHER:
    • (1) Proceed at your own risk/discretion.
    • (2) If you are not fully confident of your ability to perform the steps described, then don't proceed.
    • (3) Do NOT use your computer's card reader to carry out this process.
    • (4) The SD cards must be in the DP-xx and interfaced with the computer using the DP-xx USB port.
    • (5) The transfer and renaming steps all must be done using the DP-xx USB interface with the computer.
    • (6) If you don't rename the default dp-xx.sys file created by the formatting process, it will be overwritten. Make sure you've made the backup copy of the default dp-xx.sys file beforehand so you can reverse the process if necessary.
    • (7) Only make the transfer to a newly formatted SD card. This transfer process has NOT been tested on SD cards that already have songs on them.
    • (8) Before recording a new song on the new SD card, make a short test song, save it, turn of the DP-xx, and reboot to confirm the custom dp-xx.sys file will work properly on the new SD card. If there's a problem, you will see a "card error" message; you will not be able to use the custom dp-xx.sys file; and will need to do a quick format to reinstall the default dp-xx.sys file.
    Solution:
    If you want to move your custom User settings to a new SD card, you can copy the DP-xx.sys file from an SD card that already has the custom User settings to the newly formatted SD card.
    • Boot the DP-xx using the SD card with the customized User settings.
    • Use the DP-xx USB port to connect the DP-xx to the computer.
    • Use the computer to copy the dp-xx.sys file with the custom settings from the SD card to your computer.
    • Disconnect the DP-xx USB port from the computer following the proper procedure.
    • Turn off the DP-xx.
    • Remove the SD card with the custom User Settings from the DP-xx.
    • Boot the DP-xx using the new SD card and follow the standard format procedure.
    • Once the DP-xx boots into multitrack mode, use the DP-xx USB port to connect the DP-xx to the computer.
    • Use the computer to rename the dp-xx.sys file on the new SD card to dp-xx(1).sys (e.g., rename dp-24.sys to dp-24(1).sys)
    • Use the computer to move the dp-xx(1).sys file to the Utility folder on the new SD card for safekeeping in case a problem comes up.
    • Use the computer to copy the dp-xx.sys file with the custom User settings from the computer to the new SD card.
    • Disconnect the DP-xx USB port from the computer using the proper procedure.
    • Turn off the DP-xx.
    • Boot the DP-xx using the new SD card.
    Once bootup is complete:
    • Open the location of your Custom User Settings (e.g. Effects)
    • Turn on the Effect.
    • Scroll down the Library choices to the User section, and you should see your Custom User settings.
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2019
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  15. -mjk-

    -mjk- Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
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    From:
    Hukou Township, Hsinchu County, Taiwan
    Gear:
    DP-32, | 2A Mixer, A3440
    Today I discovered that plugging a cable into the Send 1 output jack does not break the "normal" to the internal effects. I found it quite interesting that I was able to send the signal both to the internal effects, and an external effects device. So, I can run a cable to the patchbay and leave it inserted in the Send 1 output jack with no effect (pun intended!) on the signal going to the internal effects. Cool!
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  16. Mark Richards

    Mark Richards Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    From:
    Southern USA
    Gear:
    DP-24, vintage 40-4
    CREATING A GAPLESS PRACTICE LOOP

    The DP-xx "Repeat" function is designed for practicing Punch In/Punch Out, and for auto-punching multiple takes on virtual tracks.

    As such, the "Repeat" function does not have a gapless looping capability.

    If you need a gapless loop for practice purposes, here's what I would do as a work around:
    • Record 8 bars on a Track
    • Mark the In/Out points
    • Starting at the Out point, Copy/Past as many bars as you care to play along with, up to 99 times (e.g. copying 8 bars 25 times gives you a total of 208 bars to use to get your groove going).
    While your getting your groove, record your playing on another track. Perhaps use Auto Punch/Repeat to automatically start/stop the play-along recording. That will fill up to 8 virtual tracks of your playing. Who knows what magic might happen.

    When you're done you could Copy/Paste the best magical sections of the various virtual tracks to another empty track, stitching together the perfect take. Now your changing over from musician to audio engineer/producer. Have some fun.:)
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2019
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  17. Mark Richards

    Mark Richards Well-Known Member

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    From:
    Southern USA
    Gear:
    DP-24, vintage 40-4
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 6, 2020
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  18. Phil Tipping

    Phil Tipping Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
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    From:
    West Wales, UK
    Gear:
    dp-32sd, 202 mkIII
    Effect Parameters
    A fellow dp user discovered the German manual included with his dp machine was longer than the English version. Seems it contained a full list of effect parameter settings - see attached photos - may be useful.
    Effect-Parameters-1.jpg
    Effect-Parameters-2.jpg
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  19. Mark Richards

    Mark Richards Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    From:
    Southern USA
    Gear:
    DP-24, vintage 40-4
    THE BASICS OF SYNCING A DP-24/32 WITH A MIDI DRUM MACHINE
    In this example, I'm using the MIDI features on my DP-24 and on my Beat Buddy drum machine to sync the Beat Buddy with my DP-24. Other MIDI drum machines may have some differences in their set up in order to work with the DP-24/32.

    If you have a DP-24/32 SD, there are workarounds discussed elsewhere in this forum for using MIDI. Phil Tipping's free video #13 (found in the forum's Sticky section) also demonstrates a way to use MIDI with a DP-24/32 SD.

    These are the settings I used to sync the Beat Buddy with the DP-24:

    BEAT BUDDY: MIDI IN (slave)
    (the BB default settings did not need any changes. Some drum machines may need to be set to Slave.)

    DP-24/32: MIDI OUT (master)

    DP-24/32 MMC Settings:
    MODE..................................................MASTER
    DEVICE ID..........................................ALL

    DP-24/32 REMOTE CONTROL Settings:
    MODE.................................................SLAVE
    PGM CHANGE EFF............................OFF
    CONTROL CHANGE..........................OFF

    DP-24/32 SYNC GENERATOR.........CLOCK

    CAVEATS:
    • The DP-24/32 MIDI settings aren't saved as a global setting. The MIDI settings must be turned on for each new song, and then are saved with that song. The work around is to add the MIDI settings to your default song template (see the Stickey with Phil Tipping's free videos if you're not familiar with creating song templates).
    • The DP-24/32 does not read a song's Tempo (BPM) and Time Signature (4/4, 3/4, 6/8 etc.). These first must be set manually for your song in the Metronome Screen prior to tracking, and will be saved with the song once set.
    • The DP-24/32 BAR Display screen should be ON for convenience, but that's not essential. The ABS screen display can be on instead.
    • The Beat Buddy takes on and syncs to the Tempo that shows in the DP-24/32 Metronome Screen and Bar Display.
    • The Beat Buddy does not take on and sync to the Signature in the DP-24/32 Metronome Screen. To sync properly, the Beat Buddy also must match the Time Signature of the DP-24/32 song. In other words, the Beat Buddy and DP-24/32 Time Signatures must match and must be set manually. Other MIDI drum machines will likely behave the same way.
    • The DP-24/32 must always be re-wound to Bar 1/Beat 1 for the Beat Buddy to start/sync when the DP-24/32 Play button is pressed. (This is essential if building multiple drum sound tracks, e.g. overdubbing a hand percussion beat track to a previously recorded Bossa Nova beat track.) Other MIDI drum machines will likely behave the same way.
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2019
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  20. -mjk-

    -mjk- Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
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    From:
    Hukou Township, Hsinchu County, Taiwan
    Gear:
    DP-32, | 2A Mixer, A3440
    I have the DP-32, a Korg keyboard, Roland drum machine and TC-Helicon processor all connected together using the Midiplus 4x4:

    http://www.midiplus.com/html/MIDI 4X4.html

    This device does not have pass through, so devices must be patched. I use Miditrix and the whole setup works flawlessly. I can use Miditrix to patch any available MIDI device to any other and even all together. The Midiplus 4x4 is USB powered, and makes MIDI connections with the computer and connected devices possible too. It's become indispensable to my production workflow.
    Mark Richards likes this.
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