Demoitis

Discussion in 'Recording 101' started by -mjk-, Sep 8, 2019.

  1. -mjk-

    -mjk- Moderator Staff Member

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    I think at one point or another everyone of us has become overly attached to something that we did, just because we listened to it so many times. It's not unusual for artists to be disappointed with the mix done by an outside engineer or studio, just because it sounds different. It really takes a certain kind of mindset to play something and be able to listen to it as if you've never heard it before. If an artist or engineer can develop that quality, it will help them tremendously throughout their career.

    Check out this hilarious video where Rick Beato gives some real-life experiences of demoitis:

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  2. Arjan P

    Arjan P Well-Known Member

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    Wow, that guy makes great videos. Just had to finish watching his video on Tool's Schism - fantastic! (What makes this song great series)
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  3. -mjk-

    -mjk- Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes, he's quite good. You should check out his series episode on Boston.

    I was thinking today, that we might wanna start a recording anecdotes thread, because I definitely have some funny stories to tell but they all have good lessons to learn.
  4. skier

    skier Active Member

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    Wow! I've been through this before, and on both sides. It's so true how we can get attached to those nuances, even though we may have hated some of those nuances the first few times we heard them in the recording. It certainly exemplifies how much we humans are creatures of habit, just like any other mammal. Habit breeds comfort. (Now I have justification for trading in any cheaper gear I have for the best there is... if I only had more money... hmmmm...)
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  5. skier

    skier Active Member

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    That is a good idea!
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  6. -mjk-

    -mjk- Moderator Staff Member

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    I'll consider doing that in the General Chat forum. It'll be about recording, but it won't be necessarily instructional, lol.
  7. -mjk-

    -mjk- Moderator Staff Member

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    @skier early on in my career as a producer, I recognized that I had the ability to listen to something in the context of it being the first time I ever heard it. It took me quite some time however, to figure out that not many other people could do that. I thought it was normal to be able to do that. It is not.

    During mixing sessions, I would ask the band what they thought about certain adjustments to the mix, and often the only comment I would get was "That's different". Well of course I knew it was different, but what I wanted them to tell me was whether they liked it or not. More often than not, they couldn't say.

    I've had some artists talk about being "protective" of their songs. But since I wasn't a threat to their intellectual property, again it took me some time to figure out that what they were saying was, they heard something in their head and it was etched in stone. I can imagine how frustrating it is for a songwriter who is not a recording engineer, to go into a studio and try to get something they hear in their head to come out of the speakers. I really can appreciate that. It's all about interpretation. I have done sessions in English, Spanish, Chinese, and Thai languages. There are universal concepts of course like flat and sharp, but everything else is subjective. That's why producers exist. And, once you settle on a producer, you must trust him or her to deliver the product.

    Wow, I really went off on that one!