Us-600 and Ubuntu Linux

Discussion in 'USB PC Audio Interfaces and Control Surfaces' started by ebisumartin, Feb 9, 2013.

  1. ebisumartin

    ebisumartin New Member

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    I am interested in purchasing a Tascam us-600. However, I use Ubuntu Linux, and it is not clear if the unit uses standard plug and play USB, or if it requires drivers that will only work on Windows.

    In short, can I use a Tascam us-600 with Ubuntu? If so, I'll be buying it immediately.

    Thank you for any information.
  2. jamorim

    jamorim New Member

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    Tascam us 600
  3. Artunsan

    Artunsan New Member

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    I'm also interested in linux support, but not necessarilty in Ubuntu. Has anyone managed to get US-600 to work with any linux distro?
  4. mike0000

    mike0000 New Member

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    Hi,
    I bought an US-600 and it works perfectly under windows.

    But I switched to ubuntu, and now ist a 'useless brick'.

    Any suggestions how I get the us-600 under ubuntu to work, please?
  5. mike0000

    mike0000 New Member

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    up
    Hello?
  6. Jarno

    Jarno Member

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    Espoo S.A.R, Soviet Finlandia
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    I don't think TASCAM provides Linux drivers on any of it's products. And why should they? Linux isn't really your OS choise when it comes to DAW. No ... I'm not a Linux hater ... used it since 0.something version (I think I got my first copy from Linus himself ... not sure though ... it was too long time ago).
  7. Linuxdude

    Linuxdude New Member

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    I just lost interest in purchasing Tascam products. Linux is absolutely the best DAW platform, and you don't even need to right drivers, smarty pants. Just release some basic specs and let the ALSA community do the rest. You sound like a hater to me.
    -almost a customer.
  8. cmaffia

    cmaffia Moderator Staff Member

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    FYI - Tascam doesn't run this site so threatening to not buy a Tascam product serves no purpose here. If you want to voice this position, I would suggest contacting Tascam directly (www.tascam.com).

    Just curious myself, how many music hardware companies support the Linux environment officially or even unofficially? Here's an old list I found and I'm not seeing a lot of high end stuff on this 2010 list:
    http://www.linuxstudiopro.com.

    What makes Linux superior over Mac or Windows for DAW applications? How did you baseline results in order to come to this conclusion? What are you basing this opinion on?

    Does the customer experience of products differ (good or bad) between Linux support and Windows/Mac support? How well will my UAD-2 cards work in Linux?

    What are your DAW application choices? How robust are they when compared to say Cubase, Pro Tools or as specialized as Ableton Live etc?

    I'm all for alternate solutions but I'm not seeing a huge movement towards the Linux environment. Not seeing it being embraced by the industry in general.

    I think this article in PCWorld nails it as I agree Linux's forte (seen first hand at many of my employers) is when used as servers.

    http://www.pcworld.com/article/252516/why_linux_on_the_desktop_is_dead.html
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2014
  9. Linuxdude

    Linuxdude New Member

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    The advantage is simple, pro quality tools and performance that unknown musicians with day jobs can afford. Totally willing to put in extra time in set up and configuration, just can't afford $ for Cubase, Pro Tools or Ableton Live. Sorry I somehow assumed tascamforums was somehow affiliated with Tascam. Don't know what gave me that idea. Also Linux allows customized installs to get more out of less hardware wise. As for industry support, it's crap as usual. Like I said, no one expects hardware venders to spend money developing for Linux, but doesn't seem like much to ask to release specs to the ALSA project. Bargain hardware is no bargain when it comes with worthless trial software that costs hundreds to unlock functionality. If I had a big budget, wouldn't look at Tascam anyway.
  10. cmaffia

    cmaffia Moderator Staff Member

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    Oh but you should because there are really no other options if you want pro-quality with ALL the bells and whistles that's affordable. If you're going to exclude Tascam, it really comes down to either purchasing consumer level junk or the stuff that's way beyond the average persons' price point. You don't need a big budget to purchase the higher end Tascam hardware like the DM3200/Dm4800 series or the UH-7000 (even more so if you purchase used). You do however need a Windows or Mac machine. I also submit that Reaper (free or single license $60) on a Window's 7 machine will fit your budget and offer you WAY more flexibility plus performance and stability than anything you are running in Linux. However if you're the type that prefers tinkering with the Linux environment and computer hardware just as much (or maybe more) than making music, then tinker away.
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2014
  11. blandoon

    blandoon New Member

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    So, in case anyone is interested in an actual answer to this question, instead of OS holy wars:

    The problem appears to be that the US-600 is not a class-compliant device - which means when you plug it into a computer, it doesn't present itself as one of the standardized USB device types. It shows up as a "vendor proprietary" class, so you have to install Tascam's drivers, such as they are. In 2015 there's really no excuse for that, but the US-600 is a few years old. Most newer, class-compliant interfaces will show up as an "audio" class device, and you won't need drivers because communication is handled by the OS (whether Windows, Mac, Linux, iOS, whatever).

    Out of the units Tascam currently makes (which are class-compliant) the closest equivalent seems to be the US-366 - except it doesn't have MIDI. The US-4x4 is a lot more expensive... so we'll see what else comes along.

    And, all OS bigotry aside, the question was asked about what DAW choices there are under Linux. There seem to be two major ones: a free, open source project called Ardour (which I haven't tried) and Bitwig Studio, which I bought and am running on both Windows and Ubuntu Linux. It looks/works a lot like Ableton Live, to the extent I've dived into it, and runs on Windows/Mac/Linux, so you have your choice. If nothing else, I found it to be a huge improvement over the lite version of Cubase that came with the US-600 - but yes, it costs money.
  12. kotatsuk

    kotatsuk New Member

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    The US-366 is not compatible with Linux... It doesn't even light up when connected. it's the same problem on a mac as long you don't install the drivers.