Anyone fully dismantled an MX2424? + fan specs provided

Discussion in 'TASCAM MX-2424' started by BusyBoxSt7, Aug 29, 2018.

  1. BusyBoxSt7

    BusyBoxSt7 New Member

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    Gear:
    mx2424 analog, adat, aes
    Title says all, wondering if anyone has removed all the contents from their Mx2424 and how long it takes. I might do it to drill out a bigger hole in the side for a 120mm fan. I don't want to risk getting metal shavings on the board and shorting something out...

    I know it's totally overkill but I'd like it dead quiet. So it's that or build some little gobos around it which seems a less direct solution and honestly would probably take me a lot longer than drilling the shell.

    In case you're wondering, the 120mm pushes 33CFM ( that's slightly more than the stock tascam fan) at 600 RPM. Even at 800 RPM and 43 CFM (!!) it's still quieter than the 1200 RPM 80 mm Noctua (and more importantly, a lower pitched hum - personal preference).

    Also in case you're wondering, the original stock fan, or at least the one in mine, is
    2440RPM
    31.4 CFM
    1.8 watts
    and a whopping 28.3 dB
    https://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/ADDA/AD0812MB-A70GL?qs=ReHhTS2aP00SD9X1bkZhTQ==

    Some of the Noctua stuff by comparison is around 6.5- 9dB if you're running slow enough / aren't using internal drives.
  2. witzendoz

    witzendoz Active Member

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    From:
    Fremantle, Western Australia
    Gear:
    M3700 MX2424 MSR16S
    As I told you in our emails, the standard sized noctua fan is quiet enough to not be heard, there will be other things in your room much louder, for example you breathing. If you really want no fan noise, why not duct the air into the MX from outside the room? Some pro studios do this with gear.

    How quiet is quiet?

    Alan.
    http://www.airportsites.net/lambert-stl/workshop1/nc_b29.aspx
  3. BusyBoxSt7

    BusyBoxSt7 New Member

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    mx2424 analog, adat, aes
    I'm sure it's hyperbole but no my breathing is not louder than the 80mm fan. I mean unless I happen to be doing a cardio workout while recording which hasn't happened yet :) ... I'm not saying it's loud. It's definitely audible though, louder than my laptop fan for sure, if not racked up and that may be the case for me (pun intended). It's not dead quiet and that would be preferable if I can make it happen in an afternoon project or so. I work at night a lot and my room is dead quiet at that time except for the AC (which needs to be fixed as well, just larger tubes needed). But, the HVAC isn't on constantly either.

    It's way less work to make a 120mm hole than to make a duct, seal it to the MX, punch a hole in the wall, add a fan on the other side of the wall. A hole also means sounds from whatever's on the other side of the wall are coming in now and vice versa. In a home or a private building with spare rooms that generate no noise, that might not matter. Neither of those are the case for me... Plus I'd rather not have a tube coming out of it, just practically speaking. And my control room is rather large so its either a long weird tube across my floor or add another $100-150 for a remote. Not to mention if I change locations, a fan mod comes with me and I don't have to modify the walls of some other room / hope there's a quiet room nearby. ... and it's $20 fan / labor vs. a different fan, more parts / probably more labor. In my particular scenario, I don't see any advantage of a duct. Unless you're thinking that when I install the 120 it will get louder than it is holding it against the current hole. But the 80mm didn't change much before/ after mounting. It sounds mostly the same, a bit louder. It's not just sheer dB on a meter though. The pitch of the larger fan is lower which is simply far less noticeable practically speaking. So, Fletcher Munson curve of course, plus the noise floor of my room is also not perfectly flat. Highs/mids are easier to block out than lows. So "6dB"ish in the low is harder to hear than "6dB"ish at a higher frequency. Again, printed specs.

    Perhaps if I do this mod I'll make a before/after video and you'll be able to see, or hear rather, that it's audible.