Track Level Question

Discussion in '2488 and DP-24/32 Digital Portastudios' started by Anthony LaCava, May 15, 2021.

  1. Anthony LaCava

    Anthony LaCava New Member

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    I own a Tascam 2488 Neo. I am very familiar with its operation.

    I just bought a Tascam 24DP-SD. When getting ready to record, the trim knobs have no effect on the input level. They do not change no matter which way the knob is turned. On the Neo, you would turn them up until the (loudest part) of the signal clipped, then you would back them down until no clipping occurs. That is not possible on the new machine. It is particularly problematic with some (acoustic) drums as they are clipping a lot. Moving the mics back is not helping much (we never had to do that with the NEO).

    Please advise. I have looked in the manual and online. There are other people who have asked the same question, but with no satisfactory answers:

    https://gearspace.com/board/newbie-...ne/1176552-recording-drums-tascam-dp32sd.html

    Any help would be appreciated.
  2. Mark Richards

    Mark Richards Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the forum, Anthony.

    The Trim Knob setting/incoming signal level does register on the Track Meter, and adjusting the Trim Knob position will be reflected in the Track signal and on the Track Meter when the Input is Assigned to a Track and the Track's Record Ready Button is engaged.

    Since you're new to the DP-24SD, I suggest reading the "New Member" sticky thread pinned in the shaded area on the first page of this forum for information important/critical to successful use of your portstudio and this forum.

    Phil Tipping's videos in the "Tutorial and Informational Videos" sticky thread can also be very helpful in understanding effective use of the DP-24/32/SD machines.

    Generally, for others coming to this thread seeking information, the Trim Knob impacts the incoming signal level. It's primary purposes are:
    • When a mic is connected to the low impedance circuit via the XLR jack:
    To reduce a hot signal and prevent clipping by being set initially full CW (full right), then backed off as needed; or by being left at full CW and changing the distance between the mic and the source; or some combination of the two.

    This, in conjunction with judicious use of the Input's Dynamic Compression, are usually effective in controlling a hot mic signal.​
    • When outboard gear or instruments are connected to the high impedance circuit via the line level 1/4" phone jack:
    To prevent a hot line level signal from clipping by being set initially full CCW (full left). The incoming signal strength should be set and controlled by the outboard device. The only time the Trim Knob would be moved off full CCW would be if the outboard device isn't capable of providing a strong enough signal, or to improve the signal to noise ratio.​

    Much more can be learned by reading the sticky threads. The first post in each sticky thread has an index.
    Last edited: May 15, 2021
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  3. Anthony LaCava

    Anthony LaCava New Member

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    Mark,

    Thank you for your quick response. Our problem is that the drum signal from our condenser mic is way too hot and backing it off is not helping while trim knob is fully CCW. Is there any other way to reduce the input level so it doesn't clip?
  4. Mark Richards

    Mark Richards Well-Known Member

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    Anthony,
    The Level Diagram in the OM indicates the Trim Knob fully CCW on the XLR circuit provides 42dB of signal attenuation.

    If you need more and your mic doesn't have an on-board attenuation pad, this is one inexpensive solution to get even more attenuation (available from multiple sources):
    Shure A15AS Switchable Attenuator
    In-line Attenuator, XLRF-XLRM, with 3-position Selector for 15, 20, or 25dB of Attenuation.
    Last edited: May 15, 2021
  5. Anthony LaCava

    Anthony LaCava New Member

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    Mark,

    Thanks, that is very helpful.

    I am not terribly happy that I need to buy another piece of equipment as IMO the solution should be in the machine. It seems like a step backwards from the 2488 NEO.

    OK, I am done ranting. I appreciate your time and expertise!
    Mark Richards likes this.
  6. Mark Richards

    Mark Richards Well-Known Member

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    42dB of signal reduction is pretty significant, but the 2488 NEO has even more: 47dB attenuation on the mic circuit.

    The only other solution "in the machine" would be to apply the Dynamic Compression on the Input circuit. That's a typical way of controlling signals with hot transients. But if not applied properly, it can suck the life out of the drums.

    I assume you've tried that already, since the 2488 NEO also has dynamic compression on the mic input circuit.
    Last edited: May 15, 2021
  7. -mjk-

    -mjk- Moderator Staff Member

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