Recording levels on a DR-05X

Discussion in 'Handheld and Field Recorders' started by hedera, Dec 4, 2019 at 6:22 PM.

  1. hedera

    hedera New Member

    Joined:
    Wednesday
    Messages:
    3
    Likes:
    0
    Gear:
    DR-05X
    I've just bought a DR-05X which will be used to record rehearsals of a 100 voice chorus singing classical and other music. It also has to record our director's instructions, speaking in (we hope) silence. We will record 16 bit stereo WAV files sampled at 44.1K with the default 2G file maximum. The format and sampling rate are what we used on our Zoom H4, which this will replace.

    After reading the section on the Level Mode functions, I'm inclined to think I should set it to LIMITER, does this sound reasonable? Does anyone have a better idea? When might I actually have to adjust the level manually and how would I know? Note that I'm a singer in the chorus and have to be able to set this and leave it.

    I considered AUTO, but we use Audacity to process our WAV files and we use the Compress Dynamics plug-in, which was developed specifically for music; I hesitate to use a level function that also does something like that.

    hedera
    Mother Nature bats last.
  2. GTBecker

    GTBecker Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2016
    Messages:
    106
    Likes:
    18
    Gear:
    DR-44WL
  3. hedera

    hedera New Member

    Joined:
    Wednesday
    Messages:
    3
    Likes:
    0
    Gear:
    DR-05X
    I appreciate the tip, but I looked at it, and it confused the hell out of me, at least partly because I do not understand decibels. I don't know how many decibels a 100 voice chorus can produce but it can be pretty loud.

    Also, one of our chorus members has been making his own recordings on a TASCAM 4 channel recorder (I forget which one - DR-40X?), and he told me last night that he has changed NO settings, he just uses everything on the default it came with. Which I think means his level mode is set to MANUAL. As far as I know he's satisfied with his recordings.
  4. -mjk-

    -mjk- Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2018
    Messages:
    950
    Likes:
    510
    From:
    Hukou Township, Hsinchu County, Taiwan
    Gear:
    DP-32, | 2A Mixer, A3440
    Does your chorus rehearse? No one really can answer your questions. Settings are just a starting point. Sit at the recorder during a rehearsal and watch what's going on. Try different settings adjustments and observe the results. That's the only way to get it right.
    Mark Richards and Arjan P like this.
  5. Mark Richards

    Mark Richards Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 2017
    Messages:
    447
    Likes:
    445
    From:
    Southern USA
    Gear:
    DP-24, vintage 40-4
    hedera maybe this will help:
    The Decibel is an Analog Measurement.
    The decibel is a logarithmic measure. A sound with an intensity that is twice that of a reference sound corresponds to an increase of about 3 decibels.

    A decibel is just an analog ratio that represents the relationship of two analog sounds. A decibel has no intrinsic value. Doubling the sound level produces a 3dB logarithmic increase of the second sound in relation to the first, regardless of what the actual first sound level is. Halving the sound level does the reverse. (e.g. for a reference sound, a 3dB increase is twice as loud; a 3dB decrease is half as loud)

    In the context of a chorus, you need to be concerned about dynamic range - the difference between the softest and loudest passages of the work being recorded. The loudest sections must not distort the sound being recorded and thus ruin the recording.

    That means keeping the recording below 0dBFS on the level meter. In practice, it's best to keep it at or below -12dBFS with occasional quick peaks approaching 0dBFS.

    To follow up on mj's suggestion:
    The distance of the recorder/mic from the chorus is also an important factor in controlling the recorded sound. The mic must be close enoughto pick up the softest passages without them getting lost in background noise, yet far enough away so the loudest passages don't distort the recording. The closer the mic is to the source, the louder will be the loudest passages.

    You need to find the sweet spot for the mic that gives the balance you need. I would use distance placement and "manual" as a starting point before thinking about using the limiter, peak reduction, or auto settings. The job of those tools is to squash the dynamic range in order to protect from distortion.
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2019 at 1:03 PM
    -mjk- likes this.
  6. hedera

    hedera New Member

    Joined:
    Wednesday
    Messages:
    3
    Likes:
    0
    Gear:
    DR-05X
    I'm slowly getting a feel for this, but let me clarify something: I'm a member of the chorus; I sing in it. I cannot be sitting next to the recorder and watching the meter to see how loud we are.

    I've already researched where a recorder (the old Zoom H4) should be placed. We place it next to the director's stand, to her left. We use an extensible tripod light stand with a screw top, which I intend to keep using, and once we've turned it to Record, we extend the light stand as high as we can reach. I got these settings from comments on the Audacity forum and they've worked well.

    With the Zoom, I could actually see whether it was recording (is the red light blinking, solid red, or off) from below, and could turn recording off from there. To turn the DR-05X off at the break and the end of the evening, we'll have to lower the stand to where we can see the top of the recorder, and push the right button.

    I agree that my best beginning bet is to leave it on MANUAL, keep using the distance and height settings we've been using, and see what we get. That's roughly what we did with the Zoom H4.

    Thanks for the helpful suggestions.